Smith Museum, Navy Pier [Printer’s History – by Thomas A. O’Shaughnessy

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Printer’s History – Designed and fabricated in Chicago by Thomas A. O’Shaughnessy [1870-1956]

 114″ H x 94″ W   [Perhaps the  largest stained glass window piece at the Smith Museum]

Location: Smith Museum of Stained Glass Windows at Navy Pier, Chicago.

The window is a memorial to Henry Olendorf Shepard, printer founder of the Inland Printer Technical School.

 It was commissioned by the Old-Time Printers Association of Chicago in the shape of illuminated manuscript page.

It was originally installed in Henry O. Shepard School, 2839 Filmore St., Chicago.

 


 

Details: Printer's History - by Thomas A. O'Shaughnessy

Details: Printer’s History – by Thomas A. O’Shaughnessy

 

To the memory of
Henry Olendorf Shepard
printer
founder of the Inland printer Technical School
Presented to the Board of Education by the Old Time Prointers Association of Chicago- 1914.

 

Details: Printer's History - by Thomas A. O'Shaughnessy

Details: Printer’s History – by Thomas A. O’Shaughnessy

 

First Iron Press – Philadelphia, 1914

 

To the left is the bust of Ottmar Mergenthaler [1854-1899], German born, American inventor of linotype press in 1886. On the right is the bust of Walter Scott, builder of the linotype press. On the bottom is Benjamin Franklin [1706-1790]

 

Details: Printer's History - by Thomas A. O'Shaughnessy

Details: Printer’s History – by Thomas A. O’Shaughnessy

 

In Honor of Printers – Past, Present and to Come
The Multipliers of Recorded Thought
Carrying Down the Centuries of Evidence of Man’s
Advancement in knowledge-
The Heralds of Peace and Good Will-
The Conservators of Wisdom- The Antagonists of Error-
The Champion of Good Works-
The Glorifiers of Achievement
The Preservers of Art, the Promoters of Culture.

 


 

As the information text reads..
Stained glass memorial windows were produced in great quantity by all the leading Chicago studios, but none produced finer and more elaborate windows than Thomas A. O’Shaughnessy. This is O’Shaughnessy’s first window in his newly developed stained glass techinque which had the unique effect of being a mosaic to be viewed from the street, and an artistic window showing its full range of artistic color by transmitting light. Using almost no paint, except the exposed parts of hands, arms, faces, O’Shaughnessy’s emphasis was on his uniquely bright glass, the superb silica of which came from near Ottawa, Illinois. The glass was produced following his instruction in Kokomo, Indiana. The result was a unique glass with clarity and subtle color gradation as important to the history of stained glass windows as the glass Tiffany produced.

The designs of the framing are distinctly Celtic Revival in their interlacing of animal forms. The interlocking deer, head and hooves clearly shown, while their bodies are a series of circles and knots, was popular motif derived from Irish manuscript paintings on the 7th and 8th century AD and is commonly found in the art of the Vikings. Both sources were important influences on the art of Thomas O’Shaughnessy.

 


 

Details: Printer's History - by Thomas A. O'Shaughnessy

Details: Printer’s History – by Thomas A. O’Shaughnessy

 

Details: Printer's History - by Thomas A. O'Shaughness

Details: Printer’s History – by Thomas A. O’Shaughness

 

Details: Printer's History - by Thomas A. O'Shaughness

Details: Printer’s History – by Thomas A. O’Shaughness

 

Details: Printer's History - by Thomas A. O'Shaughness

Details: Printer’s History – by Thomas A. O’Shaughness

 

Details: Printer's History - by Thomas A. O'Shaughness

Details: Printer’s History – by Thomas A. O’Shaughness

 

Details: Printer's History - by Thomas A. O'Shaughness

Details: Printer’s History – by Thomas A. O’Shaughness

 

Details: Printer's History - by Thomas A. O'Shaughness

Details: Printer’s History – by Thomas A. O’Shaughness

 

Printer's History - by Thomas A. O'Shaughnessy

Printer’s History – by Thomas A. O’Shaughnessy

 


 

O’Shaughnessy’s most celebrated and most important window is the 1917, McSwiney Memorial Window, a three part composition of the finest glass without paint, representing Faith Hope and Charity, in Old St. Patrick’s Church, West Adams and Des Plained Street, Chicago.. click here..

 

Hope - by  Thomas A. O’Shaughnessy

Hope – by Thomas A. O’Shaughnessy

 


 

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2 Comments to “Smith Museum, Navy Pier [Printer’s History – by Thomas A. O’Shaughnessy”

  1. George Finn says:

    A wonderful work of art and an important recording of print history. You are to be commended on your post.

    I should point out that Walter Scott designed and manufactured letterpress printing machines and folding machines, many for newspapers.

    Mergenthaler invented the Linotype, which is a keyboard operated machine, that cast lines of type used in the printing industry.

    The Linotype and newspaper letterpress printing became obsolete in the 1980’s when newspapers converted to computers to set type and generate complete plates for offset printing presses.

    • I live in Baltimore, Maryland the birthplace of the Linotype. Thank you for the
      correction about the Invention of the Linotype. I am a volunteer at the Baltimore Museum of Industry. We have a Model 8 that we cast lines on to demonstrate the process almost every Saturday for the past 16 years. Come for a visit. Thanks.

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