Five Reasons to Visit the Nathan Manilow Sculpture Park

Posted by

 

.

NMSP-Prairie Landscape-02

.

Five Reasons to Visit the Nathan Manilow Sculpture Park

[I] National Medal for the Arts

There are two sculptors who lived and worked in Chicago in the very formative years of their lives, and later, went on to receive the “National Medal for the Arts.” Mark diSuvero received the award in 2010, and Martin Puryear in 2011. Both these artists have only one permanent artwork in Chicago: “Yes! For Lady day,” by Mark di Suvero; and “Bodark Arc” by Martin Puryear. Both these sculptures are permanent collection of the Nathan Manilow Sculpture Park [NMSP].

 

.

Mark di Suvero and Martin Puryear

Mark di Suvero and Martin Puryear

.

 

National Medal for the Arts it is the highest honor given to artists and arts patrons by the United States government. The prestigious honor is given to artists for their outstanding contributions to the excellence, growth, support, and availability of the Arts in the country. Nominations are submitted to the National Council on the Arts, the advisory committee of the National Endowment for the Arts [NEA]. The award is presented by the President, in a ceremony at the White House.

Mark di Suvero is considered to be one of the most prominent artists of the American Expressionist era. He lived in Chicago in 1968-69, in a farmhouse which later became the Governors State University [GSU] campus. Here he created “Yes! For Lady Day,” using salvaged steel I-beams and a railroad tank. This monumental sculpture exudes rugged beauty, and has moving parts that gently dances in the prairie breeze. This is Mark di Suvero’s the only permanent sculpture in Chicago, and can be found at the NMSP.

Martin Puryear is known for his devotion to traditional craft. He creates modernist abstract works that are inspired by nature and draw on a range of cultures, histories and motifs. He has been selected to represent the United States at the 2019 Venice Biennale. Puryear lived in Chicago for 12 consecutive years [1978-1990]. He created “Bodark Art” in 1982. It is an example of Land Art so large it can be fully appreciated only by viewing from the air. This is Martin Puryear’s only permanent installation in Chicago; and can be seen at the NMSP.

 

Yes! For Lady Day - by Mark diSuvero

Yes! For Lady Day – by Mark diSuvero

.

 

[II] Two Land Arts so huge that they are fully visible only by Aerial View

The bigger, the better. NMSP has two monumental art-works that are so huge that they can be fully appreciated only by viewing from the air. “Field Rotation,” by Mary Miss; and “Bodark Arc” by Martin Puryear – both these works can by seen in entirety, only by aerial view. They both are examples of Land Art. Exponents of land art rejected the museum or gallery as the setting of artistic activity, and developed monumental landscape projects using on-site materials like soil, rocks, water and vegetation for creating art. The artists associated with Land Art, have usually been involved with Minimal Art and Conceptual Art.

 

.

Bodark Arc - by Martin Puryear

Bodark Arc – by Martin Puryear

 

.

 

Field Rotation - by Mary Miss

Field Rotation – by Mary Miss

.

 

House Divided - by Bruce Nauman / Conceptual Art

House Divided – by Bruce Nauman / Conceptual Art

.

 

[III] NMSP is one-stop destination to observe an array of  modern and contemporary styles

NMSP is one-stop to observe various Modern and Contemporary Art styles: Abstraction, Lyrical Abstraction, Minimalism, Post-Minimalism, Pop Art, Land Art and Conceptual Art.

 

.

Falling Meteor - by Jerry Peart

Falling Meteor – by Jerry Peart

.

 

[IV] Contributions by Chicago-based sculptors

As far as outdoor sculptures are concerned, the 1960s and 70s were very important transitional years. We moved from traditional, commemorative, figural, on-the-pedestal sculptures to modern, abstract, non-commemorative, off-the-pedestal sculptures. After the unveiling of Picasso’s Untitled monumental sculpture at the Daley Plaza, Chicago was attracting sculptors from all over the country and the world. Soon we had sculptures by like Alexander Calder, Marc Chagall, Jean Dubuffet, Henry Moore, Herbert Ferber, Isamu Noguchi and Louis Nevelson. But none of these artists are from Chicago.
The contributions by various Chicago artists in the crucial transitional phase, can be found at the Nathan Manilow Sculpture Park. Apart from previously mentioned Mark diSuvero and Martin Pureyar; NMSP has work by Richard Hunt, John Henry, Jerry Peart, Barry Tinsley, Jene Highstein, Mike Baur, Terrence Karpowicz and Abbott Pattison.

 

.

Illinois Landscape No.5 - by John Henry

Illinois Landscape No.5 – by John Henry

 

.

Flying Saucer - by Jene Highstein

Flying Saucer – by Jene Highstein

.

 

[V] Sculpture Park in a Prairie landscape

The huge collection of 30 sculptures is spread out over 100 acres of prairie land, giving each artwork plenty of space to create its own environment.

 

.

Frame - by Richard Rezac

Frame – by Richard Rezac / Nestled in the Prairie setting

.

 

[VI] Bonus reason, and a very important one: its FREE.
NMSP has free entry and free parking and is open 365 days a year.

.

Sextant Yoke - by Mike Baur

Sextant Yoke – by Mike Baur

.

.

 

.


.

RELATED LINKS

Official Website: Nathan Manilow Sculpture Park .. .. click here..

My Posts on Nathan Manilow Sculpture Park.. click here
NMSP: Collection Photo Gallery..click here..
NMSP: Collection Blogs.. click here
NMSP: Temporary Exhibitions.. click here..
NMSP: Articles..click here..
NMSP: Fundraising..click here..

Home: Public Art in Chicago.. click here..

.


.

Written by

No Comments Yet.

Leave a Reply